Author Archives: Giorgio Bertini

About Giorgio Bertini

Research Professor. Founder Director at Learning Change Project - Research on society, culture, art, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, self-organization, rhizomes, complexity, systems, networks, leadership, sustainability, thinkers, futures ++

Moral Relativism

Moral relativism is an important topic in metaethics. It is also widely discussed outside philosophy (for example, by political and religious leaders), and it is controversial among philosophers and nonphilosophers alike. This is perhaps not surprising in view of recent … Continue reading

Posted in Moral Relativism | Tagged

Camus, absurdity, and revolt

Albert Camus (1913-1960) was a French writer and existentialist philosopher. He was born in Algeria, then a colony of France, which gave him a unique perspective on life as an outsider. Camus is widely acknowledged as the greatest of the … Continue reading

Posted in Camus | Tagged

Be a meaning maker: Sartre and existential freedom

Stevens is the narrator of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Booker prize-winning novel, The Remains of the Day (1989). Anthony Hopkins owned the role in the Academy Award-nominated film adaptation of 1993. The story begins in the 1950s, when Stevens receives a letter … Continue reading

Posted in Existentialism, Sartre | Tagged ,

Question everything: scepticism as a way of life

In 155BC, Carneades the Sceptic travelled to Rome to give an important speech to the Roman Senate. Carneades was the head of the Athenian Academy and the most dignified philosopher of his day. He was known as a brillant speaker … Continue reading

Posted in scepticism | Tagged

Be with me: Heidegger in the age of the smartphone

It is early morning. A chorus of birds filters through an open window. A young woman lies in bed with her boyfriend. It is a quotidian scene, almost perfect, yet something is off. The boyfriend is checking his smartphone, a … Continue reading

Posted in Heidegger, smartphone | Tagged ,

Heidegger in Silicon Valley: technology and the hacker way

‘Software is eating the world!’ US tech investor Marc Andreessen claimed in 2011, on the eve of launching his venture capital firm, Andreessen-Horowitz. This extraordinary claim has become the mantra of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, codifying a new philosophy of tech … Continue reading

Posted in Heidegger, Information Technology, technology | Tagged , ,

Language And Hegemony In Gramsci

Book – Language and Hegemony in Gramsci introduce Gramsci’s social and political thought through his writings on language. It shows how his focus on language illuminates his central ideas such as hegemony, organic and traditional intellectuals, passive revolution, civil society, … Continue reading

Posted in Gramsci, Hegemony, Language | Tagged , ,

Gramsci’s Politics of Language: Engaging the Bakhtin Circle and the Frankfurt School

Antonio Gramsci and his concept of hegemony have permeated social and political theory, cultural studies, education studies, literary criticism, international relations, and post-colonial theory. The centrality of language and linguistics to Gramsci’s thought, however, has been wholly neglected. In Gramsci’s … Continue reading

Posted in Bakhtin, Frankfurt School, Gramsci | Tagged , ,

Marx, the Young Hegelians, and the Origins of Radical Social Theory

Book – This is the first major study of Marx and the Young Hegelians in twenty years. The book offers a new interpretation of Marx’s early development, the political dimension of Young Hegelianism, and that movement’s relationship to political and … Continue reading

Posted in Marx | Tagged

Bourdieu and Foucault on power and modernity

Foucault’s theory of disciplinary power and Bourdieu’s theory of symbolic power are among the most innovative attempts in recent social thought to come to terms with the increasingly elusive character of power in modern society. Both theories are based on … Continue reading

Posted in Bourdieu, Foucault | Tagged ,