Category Archives: Guattari

A Politics of Peripheries: Deleuze and Guattari as Dependency Theorists

Given that Deleuze and Guattari came to prominence after May 1968, many readers attempt to determine the political significance of their work. The difficulty that some encounter finding its political implications contrasts with Deleuze and Guattari’s commitment to radical causes. … Continue reading

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Guattari, Deleuze, and Cultural Studies

This essay maps the changing ways that the concepts and writings of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari have been mobilized in the journal Cultural Studies over the past three decades, reflects on roads not taken, and invites readers into a new conversation about … Continue reading

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Applying Theory to Practice: Putting Deleuze to Work

The work of Deleuze and his associates has been widely discussed, and there is a burgeoning literature on the political implications for the education system specifically. Examples in Sweden, the UK and the USA are discussed. Deleuzian writing offers a powerful … Continue reading

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Deleuze and Guattari’s Philosophy of Freedom

This volume addresses the issue of freedom in the philosophy of Deleuze and Guattari. This is all the more challenging in that Deleuze-Guattari almost never use the term freedom, preferring instead, the concept of the refrain. The essays collected in … Continue reading

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Deleuze and Guattari’s Philosophy and/as Relational Ontology

Starting from the famous statement by Deleuze and Guattari in What Is Philosophy? that ‘[i]mmanence can be said to be the burning issue of all philosophy’, this article explores their claim of an ontology of immanence and/as relational ontology in quantum terms. The … Continue reading

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Deleuze as Networkologist

The world is, for Deleuze, an intertwined series of layer of networks within networks. Which is not to say that Deleuze says all of this in anything like a systematic fashion. But all of this is present, if in the … Continue reading

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Deleuze, Guattari and Emergence

The concept of emergence – which I define as the (diachronic) construction of functional structures in complex systems that achieve a (synchronic) focus of systematic behaviour as they constrain the behaviour of individual components – plays a crucial role in … Continue reading

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Gilles Deleuze, Félix Guattari and the Total System

This paper is concerned with an aspect of Deleuze and Guattari’s thought which has not been duly analyzed: systematicity. More specifically, it deals with their conception of the system in three co-authored major works: What is Philosophy?, Anti-Oedipus and  A … Continue reading

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Returning to Revolution – Deleuze, Guattari and Zapatismo

Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri were quick to cast the Occupy movement as an expression of their own concept of ‘“multitude form” . . . characterised by frequent assemblies and participatory decision-making structures’. But where did Hardt and Negri get … Continue reading

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Gilbert Simondon and the Philosophy of the Transindividual – Technologies of Lived Abstraction

Gilbert Simondon was a philosopher whose ambitions lay in an in-depth renewal of ontology as a process of individuation — that is, how individuals come into being, persist, and transform. In this accessible yet rigorous introduction to Simondon’s work, Muriel … Continue reading

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